‘Pickled Pepper: A Moral Tale – read by yours truly

Just in case any of you read this poem/tongue-twister the other day and wondered if I could say it, well I did, and got a fair recording of it. I hope you enjoy it!

Best wishes

Lis Goodwin – your voice coach

www.gloriousvoicecoaching.com

Pickled Pepper: A Moral Tale!

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper;
but what if, just to test her,
he offered pepper (what a jester)
to his pretty sister, Hester
saying here’s face powder (to suit her).

If Peter Piper offered pickled pepper to his sister, Hester?

Hester, with a fluster, sneezing (bless her)
would chase, and batter Peter, and
chuck his pepper in his peepers!

Leaving sneezing, watering-eyed Peter
pepperless, battered, bruised and wheezing
having learned the lesson of his teasing!

Remember younger, smaller sibling:
It is unfeasible
to assume your bigger sister teasable!

© Lis Goodwin 2016

I had fun writing this – I hope you enjoyed it!

Best wishes

Lis Goodwin – your voice coach

www.gloriousvoicecoaching.com

The answer to yesterday’s tongue-twister conundrum

What did the writer mean?

Yesterday I wrote a post containing the Tuesday Tongue_Twister, and yet there was an issue! A question! Eeek!

“She sat upon a balcony, inimicably mimicking him hiccuping and amicably welcoming him in.”

So what’s the problem here? Well, inimicably isn’t a word! *shrieks*

I know!

Calm down.

First of all, when I searched I got this:whoop.jpg

So what do the two most likely words (inimitably and inimical) actually mean, and do either of them fit the context of the tongue-twister?

inimitable

Well, she can’t be mimicking him inimitably – that doesn’t work.

inimical

Uhm, well…. how about she’s mimicking him in a hostile way, and then ‘amicably welcoming him in.’ – well, frankly that doesn’t work much better, does it?

Ah, well, it just shows you that words are fascinating, and we often use them wrongly – get to know and love your dictionary, whether paper or online, because we all need to use them! In fact if you’re going to read anything challenging, you will certainly need to use one.

Anyway, I hope you enjoyed this little sojourn into the dictionary to sort out whether maybe the writer meant this or maybe the writer meant that. If you have any ideas for re-writing the writers tongue-twister, please leave a well-written comment in the writing box below. Or something….

Best wishes

Lis Goodwin, your voice coach

http://www.gloriousvoicecoaching.com

Tuesday Tongue-Twister – and spot the error!

I found this and something went *ping* nope *whoop, whoop, whoop* sound the vocabulary alarm! Can you spot the error? I bet most of you can, so please leave a comment. If there’s any doubt by tomorrow I will post some interesting and curious options as to what it should say!

“She sat upon a balcony, inimicably mimicking him hiccuping and amicably welcoming him in.”

Best wishes

Lis Goodwin – your voice coach

http://www.gloriousvoicecoaching.com

Tuesday Tongue-Twister

This one is an absolute corker! Whoever wrote it wanted to test the most ardent person for whom English is their second language. Goodness, every confusing little quirk of the English language can be summed up quite neatly by this gem – enjoy!

A rough-coated, dough-faced, thoughtful ploughman strode through the streets of Scarborough; after falling into a slough, he coughed and hiccoughed.

I hope you enjoyed that! Do you have a favourite tongue-twister you’d like to share? Do share it in the comments below!

Best wishes

Lis Goodwin – your voice coach

http://www.gloriousvoicecoaching.com

Three Tongue Twisters!

These are great fun!

Something in a thirty-acre thermal thicket of thorns and thistles thumped and thundered threatening the three-D thoughts of Matthew the thug – although, theatrically, it was only the thirteen-thousand thistles and thorns through the underneath of his thigh that the thirty year old thug thought of that morning.

by Meaghan Desbiens

There was a fisherman named Fisher
who fished for some fish in a fissure.
Till a fish with a grin,
pulled the fisherman in.
Now they’re fishing the fissure for Fisher.

Betty Botter bought some butter but, said she, the butter’s bitter.
If I put it in my batter, it will make my batter bitter.
But a bit of better butter will make my bitter batter better.
So she bought some better butter, better than the bitter butter,
put it in her bitter batter, made her bitter batter better.
So ‘t was better Betty Botter bought some better butter.

 

What do you think? They certainly get you paying attention! You can find lots more here: Click!

Do you have a favourite? Share it in the comments!

Best wishes

Lis Goodwin, your voice coach

http://www.gloriousvoicecoaching.com

Audio

The Setter Sweater Store – a poem by Kenn Nesbitt

This is a great poem, and fun to read. It’s a great way to introduce the idea of tongue twisters, and encourages clients to think about meter and measure of their voice, in order to speak clearly and not just race through it as some kind of speed challenge!

I hope you enjoy it!

You can visit Kenn’s website at www.poetry4kids.com

Best wishes

Lis Goodwin, your voice coach

http://www.gloriousvoicecoaching.com